Welcome

Organizing
Committee

Technical Tracks

Preliminary Program

Tutorials Program

Keynote Speakers

Registration

Accommodation

Travel Info

Downloads




 

Tutorials Program

Bus Schedule:

The bus will be at the hotel at 9:00AM and leave to FIT Tech campus by 9:30. The bus will return at 1:45PM, remain on site and leave again at 3:30PM for afternoon sessions. It will return to the hotel about 7:45pm.

Session Schedule:

SAC 2003 offers the following half-day tutorials:

10:00AM - 1:00PM
4:00PM - 7:00PM

T1: Wireless/Mobile Network Security

By: S.R. Subramanya, University of Missouri.

T2: Resource and Mobility Management in Next Generation Wireless Systems

By: Sajal Das, University of Texas at Arlington.

T3: Semantic Web and Ontologies

By: Raphael Volz, University of Karlsruhe

T4: Complex Event Processing in Distributed Enterprise Systems

By: David Luckham, Stanford University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Registration Fee:

The Tutorial registration fees and deadlines are as follows:

Registration Type
Registered
Fee
Member of ACM or SIGAPP
By 2/7/2003
$125
Non-Member
By 2/7/2003
$150
Member of ACM or SIGAPP
After 2/7/2003
$145
Attendee - Non-Member
After 2/7/2003
$175
Student
Any Time
$40

 

 

 

 

 

Abstracts:

T1: Wireless/Mobile Network Security

By: S.R. Subramanyai, University of Missouri.

Abstract:
The proliferation of wireless and mobile communication networks have resulted in an explosion of the data transmissions over such networks. Increasingly more sensitive and strategic data are expected to transmitted over such networks in the near future. However, wireless and mobile networks have several severe constraints that make them vulnerable for attacks from a variety sources. This calls for adapting several current security techniques and development of newer techniques to provide the required security. This tutorial is intended to give a good overview of: (a) the principles and practices of various aspects traditional network security, (b) the issues in mobile and wireless security, and (c) techniques and applications of mobile and wireless security.

The Presenter:
Dr. S. R. Subramanya received his masters degree in computer science from Indiana University, Bloomington, and the doctoral degree in computer science from George Washington University, Washington, D.C. He was the recipient of Richard Merwin memorial award at George Washington University in 1996, and Grant-In-Aid of Research award from Sigma-Xi in 1997. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Missouri--Rolla. He has been teaching courses and conducting research Multimedia Systems and Computer Security. He has presented tutorials on Multimedia Systems and Computer Security at several conferences. He has also developed course material for distance education on Multimedia Systems and Computer Security, which have been offered to employees at different Boeing facilities. He has served as a reviewer, program committee member, and session chair of several International Conferences and as a reviewer for several journals.

T2: Resource and Mobility Management in Next Generation Wireless Systems

By: Sajal Das, University of Texas at Arlington.

Abstract:
The desire for ubiquitous access to information while ``on the move" characterizes an entirely new computing paradigm, called `mobile wireless computing'. This emerging field has the potential to dramatically change the society as users become untethered from their information sources and communication media. The driving forces are the wide availability of hand-held devices (laptop/palmtop computers, pocket PCs, PDAs, etc.), rapidly emerging next generation (3G/4G) wireless systems such as UMTS, IMT-2000, wireless Internet, as well as the tremendous advent of wireless access technologies like GSM/GPRS. Cdma2000, PCS1900, wireless LANs, Bluetooths, and so on. To support multimedia (audio, video, text) traffic over next generation wireless networks and to provide global seamless roaming capability is, however, an extremely challenging task. Killer applications include news-on-demand, video-on-demand, web browsing, traveler information, health monitoring, or tele-medicine services over wireless to the mobile users. Besides efficent management of scare resources like wireless bandwidth, there exist numerous mobility-induced networking issues that need to be solved. For example, dynamic network topology management, location (mobility) management, wireless data networking, QoS provisioining, mobile Internet architectures/protocols, mobile databases, disconnections handling, or mobile data security are some of these important problems. This tutorial aims at bringing out the research and technological challenges in the resource and mobility management in next generation heterogeneous wireless systems. It will also provide some emerging solutions for this problem to support wireless data networking.

The Presenter:
Dr. Sajal K. Das received B.Tech. degree in 1983 from Calcutta University, M.S. degree in 1984 from Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, and PhD degree in 1988 from the University of Central Florida, Orlando, all in Computer Science. Currently he is a Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and also the Founding Director of the Center for Research in Wireless Mobility and Networking (CReWMaN) at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA). Prior to 1999, he was a professor of Computer Science at the University of North Texas (UNT), Denton where he founded the Center for Research in Wireless Computing (CReW) in 1997, and also served as the Director of the Center for Research in Parallel and Distributed Computing (CRPDC) during 1995-97. Dr. Das is a recipient of the UNT Student Association's Honor Professor Award in 1991 and 1997 for best teaching and scholarly research; UNT's Developing Scholars Award in 1996 for outstanding research; and UTA's Outstanding Senior Faculty Research Award in Computer Science in 2001. His current research interests include resource and mobility management in wireless networks, mobile and pervasive computing, wireless multimedia and QoS provisioning, sensor networks, mobile Internet architectures and protocols, distributed processing, grid computing, performance modeling and simulation. He has published over 200 research papers in these areas, directed numerous projects funded by industry and government, and filed four US patents in wireless mobile networks. He is a member of the IEEE TCPP and TCCC Executive Committees, and Advisory Boards of several cutting-edge companies.

T3: Semantic Web and Ontologies

By: Raphael Volz, University of Karlsruhe

Abstrcat:
Tutorial Summary :
Recently there is a rapidly increasing interest in the "Semantic Web". The Semantic Web is a vision: the idea of having content on the web defined and linked in a way, that it can be interpreted by machines - not just for display purposes, but for using it in various applications. Ontologies provide the conceptual backbone for the Semantic Web by giving a semantic characterization of the content. Ontologies also enjoy popularity in application areas such as e-Commerce, Knowledge and Content Management, Information Integration, Bio Science and intelligent e-Services. The goal of this tutorial is to acquaint the audience with the basics of Semantic Web technologies having a particular focus on ontologies:

1. What are the technological foundations of the Semantic Web?
2. How are ontologies represented?
3. How are ontologies engineered?
4. What are application scenarios for Ontologies and Semantic Web technologies?

It is the objective of this tutorial to communicate to the audience a comprehensive picture of the Semantic Web. The audience will learn which role ontologies and Semantic Web technologies may play in future Web-based information systems.

Tutorial Objectives: It is the goal of this tutorial to teach the audience about means for building and driving ontologybased Semantic Web applications. In order to do this, the audience will learn about Semantic Web standards and how to represent, engineer and use ontologies in Semantic Web applications. In particular, we want to give the audience an overall view of the subject. Thus, database and web researchers will learn about how their work (e.g. conceptual modeling, web information systems, semi-structured data) relates and contributes to ontology-based applications. A special focus will be set on Semantic Web applications.

Tutorial Content: In the structure of the tutorial we will follow the four building blocks mentioned in the summary: technological foundations, ontology representation, ontology engineering, and SemanticWeb applications. During the tutorial particular topics will be related to widely-known results of research in databases and web engineering.

Target Audience: The tutorial is aimed at ² practitioners who want to learn about the potential benefit of Semantic Web technologies and ontologies for their systems and the way to put the technologies into practice, and ² researchers who want to get a complete picture of current work and research in ontologies and Semantic Web and the potential contribution of their research for the development of the Semantic Web.

The Presenter:
Raphael Volz is a research assistant in applied computer science at the University of Karlsruhe. He has taught classes about the Semantic Web, Intelligent Systems and Web technologies. He is currently involved in several international research projects on the Semantic Web and was in charge of the architecture of a large Semantic Web based portal: www.ontoweb.org. He is also active in the standardization of the Web ontology language (OWL) with the W3C. Raphael Volz studied informatics and life sciences at the Universities of Heidelberg and Karlsruhe. Visiting the Information Technologies Research Lab of Swiss Life, Zuerich, he wrote his master thesis on the acquisition of ontologies using Text-Mining. His current research interest is the intersection of traditional database theory and Semantic Web techologies. Raphael published over 30 papers in refereed journals, conferences and workshops and has held a number of invited talks on ontologies, i.e., at the UN FAO, Rome and HP Labs, and Stanford.

T4: Complex Event Processing in Distributed Enterprise Systems

By: David Luckham, Stanford University

Abstract:
The enterprise information technology (IT) infrastructure has been called "an eventdriven nervous system". Complex Event Processing (CEP) is an emerging technology for coping in realtime with the tasks of managing the IT infrastructures of large electronic enterprises. This includes a spectrum of management tasks such as effective control of eBusiness supply chains, monitoring internet-based enterprise collaborations by means of high level business events, autonomous regulation of eMarketplaces, and Cyber defense of our national IT infrastructure. At present we do none of these tasks well. And effective solutions to any of them present an enormous business opportunity. All of these management tasks have in common the need to aggregate high level intelligence from the lower layers of the enterprise nervous system. CEP is a technology to track causality between events, and to aggregate complex high level events from sets of lower level events. CEP enables us to understand easily what activities are taking place in our IT systems. That is, understand how those activities will affect critical functionality of the enterprise. Only then can we take effective action, or succinctly and correctly express automated rules to manage the electronic enterprise. This tutorial will cover the basic concepts of CEP, including (i) the need for new technologies to manage the electronic enterprise, (ii) basic events and complex events, (iii) relationships of time, causality, independence and aggregation between events, (iv) hierarchical structure in enterprises and how to precisely define corresponding complex event hierarchies, (v) event pattern languages and rules, (vi) applying event hierarchies to enterprise management. Illustrative examples will be given of causal event analysis in eBusiness processing and in Cyber defense, and the use of event pattern constraints in hierarchical viewing of the conformance of activity within the enterprise to its policies.

The Presenter:
David Luckham has held faculty and invited faculty positions in mathematics, computer science and electrical engineering at eight major universities in Europe and the United States. He was one of the founders of Rational Software Inc. in 1981, supplying both the company's initial software product and the software team that founded the company. He has been an invited lecturer, keynote speaker, panelist, and USA delegate at many international conferences and congresses. Currently, he is a member of the Computer Systems Laboratory, Stanford University. His research and consulting activities in software technology include multi-processing, event based simulation languages and systems, and Complex Event Processing. He has published four books and over 100 technical papers; two ACM/IEEE Best Paper Awards, several of his papers are now in historical anthologies and book collections. His latest book, The Power of Events, deals with the foundations of complex event processing in distributed enterprise systems.