Banquet Guest Speaker

Wednesday March 14, 2007
6:30 - 9:30PM


Korean IT policy - IT839


Dr. Jung-hee Song
Assistant Mayor and Chief Information Officer
Information System Planning Division
Seoul Metropolitan Government, Korea

Abstract
Korean IT policy initiated by Ministry of Information and Communication called IT839 Strategy will be introduced. By defining government role in the u-Korea vision pursuit, it removes uncertainties for IT industry and increases its active participation. As capital of Korea, Seoul presented a grand plan to be u-Seoul. An overview of u-Seoul Master-plan will be delivered with introduction of 5 specific projects.

Speaker's Bio
Dr. Jung-hee Song is an Assistant Mayor and CIO of Seoul Metropolitan Government, Korea. She received the B.S.E. degree in Electronic Engineering from Seoul National University, in 1981, the M.S. degree from the University of Texas in 1984, and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, in 1989. Previously, she was an assistant professor at Sogang University, Seoul, Korea and she worked for the Samsung Electronics, Telezen co., and Ministry of Information and Communication.

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Keynote Speaker

Monday March 12, 2007
9:00 - 10:00AM


A New DBMS Architecture for DB-IR Integration


Dr. Whang, Kyu-Young
Director of Advanced Information Technology Research Center
Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
Daejeon, Korea

Abstract
Nowadays, there is an increasing need to integrate the DBMS (for structured data) with Information Retrieval (IR) features (for unstructured data). DB-IR integration becomes one of major challenges in the database area. Extensible architectures provided by commercial ORDBMS vendors can be used for DB-IR integration. Here, extensions are implemented using a high-level (typically, SQL-level) interface. We call this architecture loose-coupling. The advantage of loose-coupling is that it is easy to implement. But, it is not preferable for implementing new data types and operations in large databases when high performance is required. In this talk, we present a new DBMS architecture applicable to DB-IR integration, which we call tight-coupling. In tight-coupling, new data types and operations are integrated into the core of the DBMS engine in the extensible type layer. Thus, they are incorporated as the "first-class citizens" within the DBMS architecture and are supported in a consistent manner with high performance. This tight-coupling architecture is being used to incorporate IR features and spatial database features into the Odysseus ORDBMS that has been under development at KAIST/AITrc for over 16 years. In this talk, we introduce Odysseus and explain its tightly-coupled IR features (U.S. patented in 2002). Then, we demonstrate excellence of tight-coupling by showing benchmark results. We have built a web search engine that is capable of managing 20~100 million web pages in a non-parallel configuration using Odysseus. This engine has been successfully tested in many commercial environments. In a parallel configuration, it is capable of managing billons of web pages. This work won the Best Demonstration Award from the IEEE ICDE conference held in Tokyo, Japan in April 2005.

Speaker's Bio
Kyu-Young Whang is Professor of Computer Science and Director of Advanced Information Technology Research Center (AITrc) at KAIST. Previously, he was with IBM T.J.Watson Research Center from 1983 to 1990. Since joining KAIST in 1990, he has been leading the Odysseus DBMS project featuring tight-coupling of DBMS with information retrieval (IR) and spatial functions. Dr. Whang is one of the pioneers of probabilistic counting, which nowadays is being widely used in approximate query answering, sampling, and data streaming. One of the algorithms he co-developed at IBM Almaden (then San Jose) Research Lab in 1981 has been made part of DB2. Dr. Whang is the author of the first main-memory relational query optimization model developed in 1985 and reported in 1990 in ACM TODS in the context of Office-by-Example (OBE). This model influenced subsequent optimization models of commercial main-memory DBMSs. His research has covered a wide range of database issues including physical database design, query optimization, DBMS engine technologies, and more recently, IR, spatial databases, data mining, and XML. Dr. Whang is a Co-Editor-in-Chief of the VLDB Journal, having served the journal for 17 years from its inception as its founding editorial board member. He is a Trustee Emeritus of the VLDB Endowment and served the international academic community as the General Chair of VLDB2006, DASFAA2004, and PAKDD2003, as a PC Co-Chair of VLDB2000, CoopIS1998, and ICDE2006, and as an editorial board member of journals such as IEEE TKDE and IEEE Data Engineering Bulletin. He served as an IEEE Distinguished Visitor from 1989 to 1990. He earned his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1984. Dr. Whang is an IEEE Fellow, a member of the ACM and IFIP WG 2.6.

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Keynote Speaker

Wednesday March 14, 2007
8:30 - 10:00AM


The Evolution of Digital Evidence as a Forensic Science


Dr. Marc Rogers
Chair of the Cyber Forensics Program
Department of Computer and Information Technology
Purdue University, USA

Abstract
The field of Digital Evidence while garnering significant attention by academia, the public, and the media, has really just begun its journey as a forensic science. Digital Forensic Science (DFS) in general is an immature discipline in comparison to the other more traditional forensic sciences such as latent fingerprint analysis. Digital Evidence, which falls under the larger umbrella of DFS, truly encompasses the notion of being an applied multi-disciplinary science. The areas of Computer Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, Law, Sociology, Psychology, Criminal Justice etc. all have played and will continue to play a very large role in maturing and defining this scientific field. The presentation will look at the history of Digital Forensic Science and Digital Evidence, the current state of the field, and what might be in store for the future.

Speaker's Bio
Dr. Marc Rogers, Ph.D., CISSP, CCCI is the Chair of the Cyber Forensics Program in the Dept. of Computer and Information Technology at Purdue University. He is an Associate Professor and also a research faculty member at the Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS). Dr. Rogers was a senior instructor for (ISC)2, the international body that certifies information system security professionals (CISSP), is a member of the quality assurance board for (ISC)2's SCCP designation, and is the International Chair of the Law, Compliance and Investigation Domain of the Common Body of Knowledge (CBK) committee. He is a former police detective who worked in the area of fraud and computer crime investigations. Dr. Rogers is the associate editor of the Journal of Digital Forensic Practice and co-editor of the Journal of Digital Forensics Security and Law, and sits on the editorial board for several other professional journals. He is also a member of various national and international committees focusing on digital forensic science and digital evidence. Dr. Rogers is the author of numerous book chapters, and journal publications in the field of digital forensics and applied psychological analysis. His research interests include applied cyber forensics, psychological digital crime scene analysis, and cyber terrorism.



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